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KevCor

WVEC getting the “Tegna Set-in-a-Box”

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After five short years, 13 is getting a new set! Not sure which set-in-a-box it will take after (WXIA? KSDK? WUSA?), but considering how tight space is in their main studio space really is I don’t think it’ll be AS expansive as any of those, but it’ll be a nice refresh.

 

I DO expect them at a minimum, to get the video wall... since everyone else in the market has one.

 

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=1982638375129130 https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=733481376990374

Edited by KevCor
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A look at the "temporary set" which looks like the reading nook in my living room....

 

SN: I wonder how they choose who gets the chair with no back...

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=1982647085128259

 

If you think about it it's really smart. Forces the anchor to sit with upright posture. Most don't lean against the chair back anyway, but having no back makes you extra conscious of it.

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If you think about it it's really smart. Forces the anchor to sit with upright posture. Most don't lean against the chair back anyway, but having no back makes you extra conscious of it.

They did away with the chairs. The anchors (and the plus-1) all now stand at the table.

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Out of curiosity those camera pedestals (that a lot of TEGNA stations are getting) don’t look like they have a height drive and appear to be difficult to raise. How do they shoot people that are tall? Just use a camera far away?

 

Additionally since there’s no PTZ Head as they’re using PTZ cameras in the prompters how easy is it for them to move those cameras around? I don’t see any bars to easily move them. I imagine they're prepositioned before the show but if the camera needs to be adjusted I’d imagine the teleprompter hood limits the angle the camera can move.

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Oh my god. Best Tegna set, hands down. That lighting is beautiful.

Nope. WUSA still has everyone beat in that regard. With that being said, WVEC's version is definitely better than the standard ones that were rolled out elsewhere. The balanced use of brickwork and wood tones are a nice touch.

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Out of curiosity those camera pedestals (that a lot of TEGNA stations are getting) don’t look like they have a height drive and appear to be difficult to raise. How do they shoot people that are tall? Just use a camera far away?

 

Additionally since there’s no PTZ Head as they’re using PTZ cameras in the prompters how easy is it for them to move those cameras around? I don’t see any bars to easily move them. I imagine they're prepositioned before the show but if the camera needs to be adjusted I’d imagine the teleprompter hood limits the angle the camera can move.

 

The proper answer to these questions is a big ol' shrug from the management and a reminder that this setup is cheaper.

 

The PTZ cameras inside are small enough, and the prompter glass is large enough (it's larger than normal teleprompters) that they have room to pan and tilt inside. They don't have a steering wheel because there's nothing to steer. They're on casters (like an office chair) that move wherever, so you can just grab the base and move it. Most of the times, these installs just seem to be set and forget. Producers learn to work with the limitation of cameras that can only pan and tilt within a limited range. Ultimately, it's still cheaper to have 6 of these than even 3 partially robotic traditional camera systems.

 

If they do need to be moved, most stations just spike tape an outline on the floor of where they're supposed to go.

 

Tekskil makes the bulk of these types of prompter enclosures. A Panasonic sales rep recently told me that Tekskil is working on a pedestal with height drive and they are working to integrate it with the Panasonic PTZ camera controller. During this interaction, I also got to demo their brand new 4K-ready PTZ camera and can understand why more stations are going with them. The picture quality was incredible, the pan/tilt/zoom movement was smooth, and it was a fraction of the cost of the full-size studio camera next to it (Retail price of the PTZ camera is slated to be $12,000. The Studio Camera head unit alone costs $40,000)

 

Like it or not, but these types of cameras are only going to get more popular in local TV.

Edited by Weeters
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The proper answer to these questions is a big ol' shrug from the management and a reminder that this setup is cheaper.

 

The PTZ cameras inside are small enough, and the prompter glass is large enough (it's larger than normal teleprompters) that they have room to pan and tilt inside. They don't have a steering wheel because there's nothing to steer. They're on casters (like an office chair) that move wherever, so you can just grab the base and move it. Most of the times, these installs just seem to be set and forget. Producers learn to work with the limitation of cameras that can only pan and tilt within a limited range. Ultimately, it's still cheaper to have 6 of these than even 3 partially robotic traditional camera systems.

 

If they do need to be moved, most stations just spike tape an outline on the floor of where they're supposed to go.

 

Tekskil makes the bulk of these types of prompter enclosures. A Panasonic sales rep recently told me that Tekskil is working on a pedestal with height drive and they are working to integrate it with the Panasonic PTZ camera controller. During this interaction, I also got to demo their brand new 4K-ready PTZ camera and can understand why more stations are going with them. The picture quality was incredible, the pan/tilt/zoom movement was smooth, and it was a fraction of the cost of the full-size studio camera next to it (Retail price of the PTZ camera is slated to be $12,000. The Studio Camera head unit alone costs $40,000)

 

Like it or not, but these types of cameras are only going to get more popular in local TV.

 

I fully understand the economics of it. Just was wondering how practical it is in day to day use. But like you said you can get more of these than the typical studio camera.

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Ultimately, it's still cheaper to have 6 of these than even 3 partially robotic traditional camera systems.

 

Well they atleast have more cameras than some of the Nexstar Dalek sets where it appears there are only two manual ENG cameras setup.

 

Edit: French TV uses them a lot and they don’t bother hiding them:

 

[MEDIA=twitter]1047413500988088320[/MEDIA]

Edited by rkolsen
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On 11/24/2018 at 8:31 PM, Weeters said:

 

The proper answer to these questions is a big ol' shrug from the management and a reminder that this setup is cheaper.

 

The PTZ cameras inside are small enough, and the prompter glass is large enough (it's larger than normal teleprompters) that they have room to pan and tilt inside. They don't have a steering wheel because there's nothing to steer. They're on casters (like an office chair) that move wherever, so you can just grab the base and move it. Most of the times, these installs just seem to be set and forget. Producers learn to work with the limitation of cameras that can only pan and tilt within a limited range. Ultimately, it's still cheaper to have 6 of these than even 3 partially robotic traditional camera systems.

 

If they do need to be moved, most stations just spike tape an outline on the floor of where they're supposed to go.

 

Tekskil makes the bulk of these types of prompter enclosures. A Panasonic sales rep recently told me that Tekskil is working on a pedestal with height drive and they are working to integrate it with the Panasonic PTZ camera controller. During this interaction, I also got to demo their brand new 4K-ready PTZ camera and can understand why more stations are going with them. The picture quality was incredible, the pan/tilt/zoom movement was smooth, and it was a fraction of the cost of the full-size studio camera next to it (Retail price of the PTZ camera is slated to be $12,000. The Studio Camera head unit alone costs $40,000)

 

Like it or not, but these types of cameras are only going to get more popular in local TV.

At least it's not as bad as some of the Gray stations' camera set ups, which literally don't have prompter glass at all, and the anchor is forced to look above or below the camera to read the teleprompter. Some of them even seem to use the kind of tiny cameras you might see on a WX patio or a newsroom shot (don't know the technical term) jerry-rigged into studio cameras (see WLUC). It's pathetic.

9-5-TV6-01-1100x825.jpg

wctv-new-set-wide.jpg

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On 11/23/2018 at 2:21 AM, Ntropolis said:

Here it is

 

[MEDIA=twitter]1065712173589192712[/MEDIA]

Aw, the link broke in the move from XenFora. :classic_sad:

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1 minute ago, mre29 said:

Aw, the link broke in the move from XenFora. :classic_sad:

I think it debuts really really soon. Like, maybe today. I’d check out the live stream at 4

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7 hours ago, brb588 said:

Is it me, or is the lighting... weird?

Yesterday, everyone standing up in the studio seemed lit up from top to sides.  Noticed it during Evan Stewart doing weather and when Ali Weatherton was doing her piece. She was wearing a black dress BUT you could see thru it (outline of the inside of her legs)!!!

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1 hour ago, VARTV said:

Yesterday, everyone standing up in the studio seemed lit up from top to sides.  Noticed it during Evan Stewart doing weather and when Ali Weatherton was doing her piece. She was wearing a black dress BUT you could see thru it (outline of the inside of her legs)!!!

The perils of new lighting.  Atleast it was the outline of her legs,  here it was an anchorwomans (I’m surprised no one noticed it during the show) shirt and there were others in Baltimore when stations got new sets and lights. It happens their lighting to LED and different color temperatures so things that worked before don't anymore.  

On 11/28/2018 at 1:08 AM, AJClementeFan69 said:

At least it's not as bad as some of the Gray stations' camera set ups, which literally don't have prompter glass at all, and the anchor is forced to look above or below the camera to read the teleprompter. Some of them even seem to use the kind of tiny cameras you might see on a WX patio or a newsroom shot (don't know the technical term) jerry-rigged into studio cameras (see WLUC). It's pathetic.

9-5-TV6-01-1100x825.jpg

wctv-new-set-wide.jpg

 

I mean if they produce good images why not. WMTV’s camera’s are actually ENG type you see in the field. As for the prompters below that instance I’m curious if it’s connected someway to the PTZ Head. I’ve seen stations mount monitor on both sides of the column. Oh and the tripods the cameras at WMTV and WCTV are heavy duty ones you see in the field.

 

Now lets get back on track. 

Edited by rkolsen

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