NBC's Storm Rangers and Weather Expanisions

Discussion in 'The Weather Lab' started by rkolsen, Jul 31, 2016.

  1. WCAUTVNBC10

    WCAUTVNBC10 Troglodyte Homunculus

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  2. A3N

    A3N LIVE

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    A mean and ferocious lineup of news vehicles... and a dinky chopper. Can't help but laugh.
     
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  3. rkolsen

    rkolsen A Member of Sinclair Broadcast Group

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    I assume your referring to Storm Force 10, News Force, Storm Ranger and Sky Force? Unless they got an F-250.

    I wouldn't be putting that Promaster on soft grass. I would be worried about it sinking.

    The helicopters cute but Storm Ranger could probably out run it.
     
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  4. WCAUTVNBC10

    WCAUTVNBC10 Troglodyte Homunculus

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    Yeah StormForce is a Suburban which is about the same size as an F-250 so they're a wash
     
  5. CaptainNews

    CaptainNews Weekend Anchor

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    KNTV/KNBC Share their little tonka trucks. However they have all
    I thought they used the Orange County Doppler that KNBC has...?
     
  6. CaptainNews

    CaptainNews Weekend Anchor

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    KNBC has all the same tech except replace the hummer with a Jeep. That pro master with a Ford Transit Van. That helicopter with a Eurocopter H125. I believe that set is faster than KXAS? Not to mention how many Dopplers they have.
     
  7. A3N

    A3N LIVE

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    It's on the map, but they don't really use it for anything extensive. Basically just for looks. They rely on the NWS radar and once a year... on the storm ranger.
     
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  8. Eat News

    Eat News Station Group CEO

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    Still waiting to see these"mystery doppler" set-ups in Socal and Norcal.
     
  9. rkolsen

    rkolsen A Member of Sinclair Broadcast Group

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    Two appear on the weather map (in addition to NWS) however EEC is usually quick to promote their work. All the other Dopplers NBC has built in the last year have been from them.
     
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  10. WCAUTVNBC10

    WCAUTVNBC10 Troglodyte Homunculus

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    I've noticed that WCAU has access to WNBC's Storm Tracker 4 radar site in New Brunswick. While they make no mention of it on air, it is one of the radar sites (along with a couple of NWS sites) they use for live radar views. It makes me wonder if NBC plans on building a radar network in the Northeast similar to the one they've built in California.
     
  11. rkolsen

    rkolsen A Member of Sinclair Broadcast Group

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    I was on the FCC website and it appears one of the radar sites is up and on Mount Lukens. It appears to be an X Band frequency radar site.
     
  12. Eat News

    Eat News Station Group CEO

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    Ok...one down.
    Guess they found some space at the ENG receive site for a little radar.
    Fair enough.

    Now waiting on San Diego...
     
  13. rkolsen

    rkolsen A Member of Sinclair Broadcast Group

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    Thinking about it using those short range X-Band radars (60 miles) would definitely be good to fill the NWS radars. I'm not an expert with the terrain of Southern California but aren't there Decent size population centers in between the mountains and valleys that may not be covered fully? It makes sense - why get a high power S-Band or C-Band radar where the mountain will block its signal when you can have a series of low cost radars that provide more sensitive data.

    I know in the DFW area there was a CASA test bed using a series of 8 dual pol X-Band radars.
     
  14. Eat News

    Eat News Station Group CEO

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    I'm not an expert in radar...but I am a consumer. I don't know what they would expect to gain from this. Do they predict earthquakes or wildfires?
    The amount of useful data produced will have zero impact on the population. The current WX radar does very well for what we expect from it. Our weather almost always come off the ocean . It's a different dynamic here.

    From the location on Mt Lukins I would say that radar is a hole filler for an area that was burned a few years ago. The "Station Fire" was the largest in LA county ever. It would seem to be useful for looking at rainfall because that area can be prone to mud and landslides.
    But that's it.
    The local radar sees all that area anyway, just at higher altitude scans.

    Radar is great for areas with tornado and severe thunderstorms...where people need quick and accurate evacuation and take shelter warnings. Macro and pinpoint radar is also great for those areas.

    Nobody even has a basement out here...where will we run to? We sure as hell won't try the freeways.

    I guess NBC thinks it's worth it, because if it was REALLY needed for public safety...it would have been done a long time ago.

    The radar is small, it's hidden from view so the birdies and flowers are happy and don't have to see it. I just think it's useless and not worth the hype and investment. It's just useless data, but I guess NBC wanted to have the whole country involved so we wouldn't feel left out.

    I can see the use elsewhere in the country...just not here.
     
    #94 Eat News, Mar 27, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2017
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  15. rkolsen

    rkolsen A Member of Sinclair Broadcast Group

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    I'm pretty sure they're hole fillers and x-band ones. I'm watching KNBC right now and they have two "branded" sweeps up which are red in addition to the NWS network. I know the animation isn't anything to judge but the sweeps have a much shorter "beam".

    Edit: Looks like one is located in Orange County.
     
    #95 rkolsen, Apr 18, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2017
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  16. Eat News

    Eat News Station Group CEO

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    Well Ok...
    If they want to fill some holes I guess that's an overall good thing. As long as they have actual units and are not just piggy backing off the public NWS feed trough.
    It sounds like these things are much smaller in size, I was thinking about those giant units they use elsewhere.
    So do they just plop down the same unit like that on the storm buggy?
    Sounds like you could just put one at the ENG receive sites if you have some tower and rack space available.

    OK....
    I approve.
     
  17. rkolsen

    rkolsen A Member of Sinclair Broadcast Group

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    It doesn't list the manufacturer but they're the same frequency range (x-band) as the buggies. The antenna ranges in size from 1m - 2.44m in diameter.
     
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